How I became a content specialist


I began my career working in an in-house communications role at Airbus, which was an industrial and international environment. It was here that I realised I loved not only translating words but also transforming others’ expertise into compelling content.

Then I worked for web and PR agencies, adding a digital and media relations dimension to my editorial background. And in early 2019, I was delighted to combine my areas of expertise to help my own clients with their French content needs.

 

How I became a content specialist

 

 

I began my career working in an in-house communications role at Airbus, which was an industrial and international environment. It was here that I realised I loved not only translating words but also transforming others’ expertise into compelling content.

Then I worked for web and PR agencies, adding a digital and media relations dimension to my editorial background. And in early 2019, I was delighted to combine my areas of expertise to help my own clients with their French content needs.

 

A
long-term language addict


These days, I translate from English and Spanish to French.
But how did I get here?


Well, I started babbling English at the end of the last century, looking up Pink’s lyrics on what was then an emerging technology: the Internet. I then spent 10 years learning English in an academic environment. And now, I maintain my English skills by communicating with my clients, listening to podcasts and reading widely (see what I’m currently reading).

I also spent a year in Granada studying Spanish translation. There I practised my Andalusian accent and discovered at least two wonders: the Alhambra and free tapas.

French is my native language. It’s polished through hours and hours of reading and writing. Living in France means it’s also easy for me to stay up-to-date with the latest expressions, news and language usage.

For now, I’m sticking to translating from English and Spanish. I’m also learning German but ich kann noch nicht auf Deutsch arbeiten.

Hire me

A
long-term language addict


These days, I translate from English and Spanish to French.
But how did I get here?


Well, I started babbling English at the end of the last century, looking up Pink’s lyrics on what was then an emerging technology: the Internet. I then spent 10 years learning English in an academic environment. And now, I maintain my English skills by communicating with my clients, listening to podcasts and reading widely (see what I’m currently reading).

I also spent a year in Granada studying Spanish translation. There I practised my Andalusian accent and discovered at least two wonders: the Alhambra and free tapas.

French is my native language. It’s polished through hours and hours of reading and writing. Living in France means it’s also easy for me to stay up-to-date with the latest expressions, news and language usage.

For now, I’m sticking to translating from English and Spanish. I’m also learning German but ich kann noch nicht auf Deutsch arbeiten.

Hire me

Knowledge sharing
and collaboration



 

I participate in several professional associations and organisations such as Kontnü, a French association for content strategists.

I also teach communications classes in a few institutes of higher education. And I contribute to examination boards for students completing a diploma in intercultural management, communication and event coordination at the Catholic University of Lyon (ESTRI).

Knowledge sharing
and collaboration



 

I participate in several professional associations and organisations such as Kontnü, a French association for content strategists.

I also teach communications classes in a few institutes of higher education. And I contribute to examination boards for students completing a diploma in intercultural management, communication and event coordination at the Catholic University of Lyon (ESTRI).