The annual barometer that became a white paper
Stormshield
30 April 2014

Rydoo


A special welcome
to French users



 

With its fun travel and expenses app, Rydoo’s mission is to ‘eliminate painful and frustrating processes for companies worldwide’. Mine was to eliminate pain points and inconsistencies for their French website visitors.

Tailoring the homepage
to the French market

Rydoo, a Sodexo Corp-Up, had recently redesigned and rewritten the English version of its homepage. They asked me to translate it into French and to adapt it to the French market.

Focusing on the
French user experience

Translating the content


I translated the content from English to French, all the while keeping French connotations, cultural references and habits in mind.

English

French

For instance, using the French word for pleasure (plaisir) in this context would have sounded inappropriate for French readers. Given this, I recommended an alternative option which focused on making life easier (faciliter).

Improving the microcopy


I applied UX best practice to improve the microcopy (tiny bits of text on the interface that guide users and trigger them to act).

Before

After

In this example, I provided wording that was both shorter and more commonly used than the previous French version.

Before

After

Here, I advised addressing the reader directly and being clearer about what would happen when the user clicked on the button, in line with call-to-action best practice.


Ensuring overall consistency


When translating and adapting a digital interface, I put myself in the shoes of a French user. I reproduce their journey so I can make sure it’s a seamless experience, every step of the way.

English

French

I noticed that the English version and the French version of the case study on the website were quite different. So rather than simply translating the English excerpt, I selected a relevant extract from the French case study to maintain consistency for the reader.


Tailoring the homepage
to the French market

Rydoo, a Sodexo Corp-Up, had recently redesigned and rewritten the English version of its homepage. They asked me to translate it into French and to adapt it to the French market.

Focusing on the
French user experience

Translating the content


I translated the content from English to French, all the while keeping French connotations, cultural references and habits in mind.

English

French

For instance, using the French word for pleasure (plaisir) in this context would have sounded inappropriate for French readers. Given this, I recommended an alternative option which focused on making life easier (faciliter).

Improving the microcopy


I applied UX best practice to improve the microcopy (tiny bits of text on the interface that guide users and trigger them to act).

Before

After

In this example, I provided wording that was both shorter and more commonly used than the previous French version.

Before

After

Here, I advised addressing the reader directly and being clearer about what would happen when the user clicked on the button, in line with call-to-action best practice.


Ensuring overall consistency


When translating and adapting a digital interface, I put myself in the shoes of a French user. I reproduce their journey so I can make sure it’s a seamless experience, every step of the way.

English

French

I noticed that the English version and the French version of the case study on the website were quite different. So rather than simply translating the English excerpt, I selected a relevant extract from the French case study to maintain consistency for the reader.


 

Conveying the key message in a culturally-appropriate way

 
 
 

Conveying the key message in a culturally-appropriate way